Theme 1 – Earth System Science Modelling

Our Theme 1 programme is being developed across the following three strategic areas to address high-level questions concerning the capacity of rock weathering driven by intensively managed crops to capture carbon and ultimately affect future CO2-climate trajectories, ocean-atmosphere chemistry and marine ecosystems.

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Theme 2 – Fundamental Crop Weathering Science

Our Theme 2 programme is utilising world-class controlled environment facilities in Sheffield to elucidate mechanisms and genetic controls on weathering by major warm climate crops (maize and rice) to accelerate the development of new faster weathering varieties that maximise carbon capture and protection against pests and diseases, thus reducing pesticide usage and costs.

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Theme 3 – Applied Weathering Science

Our Theme 3 programme is undertaking large-scale field trials to address questions concerning rates of rock weathering in agricultural soils under natural conditions and how feedbacks, e.g., via nutrient release and pH change, may increase food/bioenergy crop productivity and slow soil greenhouse gas emissions.

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Theme 4 – Sustainability & Society

Our Theme 4 programme is addressing the real-world feasibility of enhanced weathering through integrated assessment modelling of its environmental and socio-economic impacts, assessment of a global sustainable supply chain capable of carbon capture and storage, and developing a responsible research and innovation framework.

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Latest newsView all

Research Fellow in Enhanced Rock Weathering

Jul 30, 2020

Enhanced Rock Weathering (ERW) is a geoengineering strategy that can help accelerate CO2 sequestration by amending soils with crushed reactive rocks to increase the rate of silicate weathering.

The Research Fellow will join the interdisciplinary Leverhulme Centre for Climate Change Mitigation and will work in close collaboration with other researchers leading lab-based experiments and modelling activities.

Based at the School of Ocean and Earth Science at the University of Southampton’s Waterfront Campus at the National Oceanography Centre Southampton, the successful applicant will join us in conducting the world’s first field trials of ERW at sites in Illinois, USA, Malaysian Borneo and the UK. These large-scale trials are providing vital new constraints on the rates of rock weathering in different agricultural settings, and hence the extent to which ERW can mitigate global greenhouse gas emissions.

You will have a PhD or equivalent professional qualifications and experience in Geochemistry and will have considerable experience in the collection and chemical analysis of environmental samples (soils, drainage waters, rivers), well-developed self and time-management skills and the ability to communicate clearly, both orally and in writing are essential.

Informal enquiries should be directed to Prof. Rachael James (R.H.James@soton.ac.uk) or Dr Christopher Pearce (C.R.Pearce@noc.ac.uk).
Applications close: 21st August 2020. 

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Climate news quiz: Rock dust and heat-ready cities

Jul 29, 2020

Test your knowledge about ways the climate is changing.

Time to see if you’ve been paying attention to The Washington Post’s climate-related coverage. If you have, this quiz should be an easy A.

 

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‘Climate urgency’ may dampen public acceptance of carbon dioxide removal technologies

Jul 28, 2020

Researchers from the Understanding Risk research group at the School of Psychology have carried out a pioneering study to gauge UK and US public acceptance on the use of carbon dioxide removal technologies to tackle climate change.

The study is in response to the suggestion that the UK must deploy novel approaches to removing C0from the atmosphere if it is to meet its commitment of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. Novel approaches include the use of carbon dioxide removal technology such as enhanced terrestrial weathering for which public and societal acceptance is critical.

Principal investigator for the study, Professor Nick Pidgeon of the School of Psychology said: “I have worked for almost 20 years on the difficult challenge of how to engage publics ‘upstream’ with novel and emerging environmental technologies about which they may know very little, and in order to promote more socially sensitive environmental science and policy. It is therefore very pleasing to see the methodological and intellectual foundations of that work reflected in the outcomes of this important research effort to develop novel ways of addressing climate change”.

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